Inverted Nipple Correction

Inverted nipples usually develop during puberty and are the result of short milk ducts. Occasionally they can occur after puberty and if this is the case it is important to ensure that you have seen your GP to ensure there is no underlying problem. They can cause considerable distress and embarrassment, as well as making hygiene and breast feeding difficult.

Surgery for inverted nipple correction is a relatively simple procedure. A small cut is made at the base of the nipple. The ducts are freed and stretched and then it is re-stitched. The sutures used are all dissolvable and do not need to be removed. This is usually performed under local anaesthetic, so that you are awake for the operation but will not feel any pain.

Complications are infrequent and usually minor. However, no surgery is without risk and it is important that you are aware of associated complications with this procedure.

There will be some discomfort for the first day. Occasionally bruising may occur, but this should rapidly resolve.

Scar – there is always some scarring where the incisions are made. This scarring can block the nipple ducts. As a result it is possible the breast feeding will not be possible.

Bleeding – this is uncommon, however if this does occur it is unlikely to require any further surgery.

Infection – this is very uncommon but may require antibiotics.

DVT/PE/fat embolus – following any surgical procedure it is possible to develop a blood clot in your legs, which could potentially break off and move to your lungs. If the blood clot is large enough it could prove fatal. In order to reduce any risks of this we give you special stockings to wear in bed and a blood thinning injection if you are not mobile.

Breast-feeding – you may not be able breast feed after this procedure.

All the risks will be discussed in detail at your consultation. However, if you have further questions or concerns, do not hesitate to discuss these with me. Decisions about cosmetic surgery should never be rushed.

At the end of the procedure, a light waterproof dressing is applied. As long as you are feeling well after the operation, you will be able to go home.

Before you leave the hospital, a follow up appointment will be booked for a week with the nurses. They will remove the dressing and ensure all is healing well. I will see you at about 6 weeks or sooner if you have any problems. You will not be able to drive yourself home from hospital, so it is often a good idea to ask a friend or family member to drive you.

If you are feeling well then you can return to work as soon as you wish. Try to avoid swimming for two weeks to prevent possible infection from contaminated water.

If you have any concerns during this period, do contact the hospital team for advice.

Anne Dancey

I hope you find this information useful. If you have any questions or require a little more information then please do not hesitate to contact me.

Anne Dancey

Plastic and Reconstructive Surgeon FRCS(Plast), MBChB(Hons), MMedSci(Hons) and MCh(PASP)